Saturday, August 1, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoLost: Heifer, near 1303 and Country View Land, went missing on June 24, reward! 210-838-0667.
Found dachshund in Abrego Lake Estates on July 23rd. Call and describe Tracy 830 477 7779
LOOKING TO FIND:Jacob Sanchez My beloved son. He can get in touch:Alberto Carvajal 786 350 8436 carvajalalberto@yahoo.com www.facebook.com/alberto.carvajal.585 ALBERTO CARVAJAL MIAMI, FL
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Himmel Home Health is hiring RN / LVN to conduct private duty nursing and skilled nursing visits w/children ages birth to 20. Elmendorf area: Sat & Sun 7am-7pm;7pm-7am. Sign-on bonus! Texas Board of Nursing license required. Send resume to careers@himmelhomehealth.com.
Warning: While most advertisers are reputable, some are not. Unfortunately the Wilson County News cannot guarantee the products or services of those who buy advertising space in our pages. We urge our readers to use great care, and when in doubt, contact the San Antonio Better Business Bureau, 210-828-9441, BEFORE spending money. If you feel you have been the victim of fraud, contact the Consumer Protection Office of the Attorney General in Austin, 512-463-2070.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


It's Time to Seize Control of America's Energy Future




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
September 6, 2013 | 2,253 views | Post a comment

By Chris Faulkner

Don't expect oil prices to fall any time soon. Although domestic oil production is expanding rapidly, oil is once again over $100 per barrel, largely due to political unrest in the Middle East.

The mere threat of a disruption in oil shipments is enough to increase prices. Just imagine what a full-on blockade in, say, the Suez Canal or the Suez-Mediterranean Pipeline would do to the U.S. energy market. With the Syrian conflict spilling over into neighboring countries, and Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC) members aligning on different sides in the struggle, the situation is ripe for a surge in prices. If Israel and Iran heat up, we could see oil prices soaring to $150.

America is not yet energy independent. But despite the recent spike in oil prices, our long-term energy outlook is bright. The ongoing domestic oil boom has given us the means and opportunity to break free from the tyranny of oil imports from hostile nations -- but only if the United States does all it can to increase and encourage domestic energy production.

The price of West Texas Intermediate (WTI) crude -- the benchmark for domestic oil prices -- has been increasing. That's good news for the futures market, and suggests the WTI is back as the world's leading oil benchmark.

And that's just the start of America's sunny energy outlook. The U.S. government recently doubled its estimates of recoverable energy in North Dakota's Bakken and Three Forks shale formations, to 7.4 billion barrels of oil and 6.7 trillion cubic feet of natural gas. And, according to the IEA, America is on track to surpass Saudi Arabia in oil output by 2017.

At the same time, OPEC is steadily losing relevance. OPEC -- a cartel including several member nations with alarming amounts of Islamist violence -- recently announced it expects demand for its oil to drop by 300,000 barrels a day next year, and projections for future demand for OPEC oil are flattening even as OPEC members compete more fiercely with each other for market share.

For far too long, America's economy has been at the mercy of the politically unstable and anti-American Middle East. Now, the tides are shifting. Oil production from non-OPEC countries is expected to rise next year by 1.2 million barrels a day. And most of that new production is coming from the United States and Canada.

What's more, Saudi Arabia's and other oil infrastructure in the Middle East has been increasingly under attack by terrorists who are seeking to disrupt global markets by blocking oil production and transportation. Vast networks of pipelines are unprotected and vulnerable, and the terrorists know it.

However, our lawmakers can't afford to take the trend toward true energy independence for granted. The only real threat to American energy security is, well, America. Politics could compromise this country's energy boom.

Take the regulatory restrictions on hydraulic fracturing, popularly known as "fracking." The recent oil and gas boom is the result of advances in this technology, in tandem with advances in horizontal drilling. In fracking, a solution that is 99.5 percent sand and water, plus a few trace chemicals, is pumped underground at high pressure to break up rock formations.

Despite the fact that over a million wells have been fracked in America with an unparalleled safety record, radical environmentalists have been trying to sway public opinion against fracking. They're deploying easily debunked propaganda. There's simply no real evidence that fracking pollutes groundwater, causes earthquakes or is responsible for any of the other outrageous claims being made against the practice.

The White House has also repeatedly denied approval for the construction of the Keystone XL pipeline, which would transport oil from Canada and North Dakota to refineries on the Gulf Coast. This project has been thoroughly reviewed and found environmentally sound. And its construction would create an estimated 42,000 jobs.

The White House has also been rebuked by federal courts for blocking drilling in parts of the Eastern Seaboard, the West Coast, Alaska and Florida. The President's agenda appears to be dictated by an extreme environmental lobby opposed to all new production conventional, economically viable energy.

Our domestic energy production capacity is growing rapidly. OPEC influence is waning. America has a rare opportunity to both ensure abundant energy growth and minimize national security risks. We must make energy production and security political priorities.

Chris Faulkner is the CEO of Breitling Energy Companies.
 
‹ Previous Blog Entry
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Commentaries Archives


Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?
auto chooserTriple R DC ExpertsVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch homeAllstate & McBride RealtyDrama Kids

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.