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Lost: Border Collie, black and white male, one eye, microchipped, C.R. 319/F.M. 775 area. 210-382-2167.

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The 81st Judicial District Attorney’s office is seeking candidates for the position of an Administrative Assistant. Duties will include but not limited to: answering incoming calls and greeting visitors, prepare discovery for defense bar as required, providing administrative and clerical support to the ADAs and District Attorney, assist in general office work and perform related duties as follows: Operate a multi-line telephone switchboard, proficient use of software applications and computer equipment, scanning and compiling files for eDiscovery, filing and creating court files, generating reports as required. Applicants must have at least five (5) years of administrative assistant experience, strong computer skills (Word, Excel, PowerPoint) ability to multi-task, excellent organizational skills and attention to detail. Some heavy lifting (about 40 pounds) required. Please mail, fax or email resumes and cover letters to the address and email below. DEADLINE FOR RESUME SUBMISSION IS MAY 6, 2016 AT 5 P.M. District Attorney Rene Pena, C/O Teri Reyes, Office Manager, 1327 THIRD STREET, FLORESVILLE, TEXAS 78114. Fax 830-393-2205. terireyes@81stda.org.
Floresville ISD is accepting applications at www.fisd.us for the position of custodian, 260 days, 5 days per week, 8 hour workday.
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Comment about food safety regulations




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October 30, 2013 | 3,830 views | Post a comment

By Kathleen Phillips

BRYAN -- These days, fruit growers need to be concerned about more than yielding a crop, especially with proposed new rules on food safety, according to Dr. Juan Anciso, Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service horticulture specialist in Weslaco.

Anciso said fruit and vegetable growers have until Friday, Nov. 15, to comment on the proposed Food Safety Modernization Act, federal regulations that will set standards for the growing, harvesting, packing, and holding of produce for human consumption.

Anciso told participants at the recent Texas Fruit Conference in Bryan that recently some farmers have been criminally charged for “adulterating” produce, a charge that now can be made whether a grower knows of the adulteration or not.

Anciso said irrigation rules written into the proposal are one area that merit close examination and comment.

“Growers in the Rio Grande Valley irrigate from the river, and there are microbes in it,” Anciso said. “There is a regulation proposed on how much E. coli can be in irrigation water to be used for food crops, for example.”

He said the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) wants to set an upper limit of 235 colony-forming E. coli units in a water sample to be used for watering food crops. But Anciso said that number comes from the level that is required to protect people swimming in water.

“It is not scientific to use those numbers for irrigation. The values have never been tested in the field to assess risk, and there is no peer reviewed scientific document to tell what the risk is above 235 units,” he said. “Drip or furrow irrigation on apples, for example, should make that crop exempt since the water doesn’t touch the fruit. And five days after the last irrigation, the microbes drop by one to four times in produce such as spinach. There is scientific peer review for that.”

Anciso suggested that the law may need to be adjusted to match real-world application rather than issue a blanket code for all crops.

He said when final rules become law, they will be adopted over time with the larger farms having fewer years to comply. He acknowledged that almost 80 percent of the 190,000 U.S. produce farms are not covered by the proposed FDA rules, but about 90 percent of the U.S. food crop acres are potentially vulnerable to harmful contamination.

The FDA has fact sheets for the 550-page proposed regulations at http://1.usa.gov/1214956.

Anciso also urged fruit growers to take the online food safety training at http://agrilifefoodsafety.tamu.edu/. Information about the AgriLife Food Safety App for mobile devices is at that website too, he said.

Kathleen Phillips writes and provides Texas AgriLife Extension Service media support for research in horticulture, plant pathology, and biochemistry and biophysics.
 

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