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Public Speaking/Customer Service, La Vernia fundraising company seeking enthusiastic presenter for busy season. Conducts kickoff presentations for fundraisers and reviews sale strategies with school to maximize school profits. Deliver/pick-up materials at local schools. Flexible schedule required. Must have reliable transportation and be able to travel in and around greater San Antonio area. Occasional overnight travel possible. Must be able to lift 25 lbs. Customer service/sales experience preferred. Flat pay rate for each presentation plus commission. For right person, position duration may be extended with a greater focus on sales. Apply in person at 1371 FM 1346, La Vernia, TX. No phone calls please.
The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department (Adult Probation) is currently seeking a qualified applicant for the position of Supervision Officer for ATASCOSA COUNTY. Requirements: A Bachelor’s degree recognized by the Texas Higher Education Coordination Board in Criminology, Corrections, Criminal Justice, Law Enforcement/Police Science, Counseling, Pre-Law, Social Work, Psychology, Sociology, Human Services Development, Public Administration, or a related field that has been approved by the Community Justice Assistance Division (CJAD), or one year of graduate study in one of the above mentioned fields, or one year experience in full-time casework, counseling, or community or group work that has been approved by CJAD.  This position requires some evening and/or weekend work. Salary: Negotiable, plus Regular State benefits. Closing Date: Resumes will be taken until November 4, 2014. Procedure: Applicants should submit a typed resume and copy of college transcript to: Mario Bazan, Director, 914 Main Street, Ste #120, Jourdanton, TX  78026 The 81st & 218th Judicial District Community Supervision and Corrections Department is an Equal Opportunity Employer. 
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Savvy Senior


Organize your family’s health history




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Disclaimer:
Jim Miller is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Jim Miller
November 20, 2013 | 907 views | Post a comment

Dear Savvy Senior,

What can you tell me about creating a family health history? My doctor recently suggested that I make one as a way to predict potential health problems as I get older, but I could use some help.

Getting Old

Dear Getting,

It’s a smart idea! Even with all the high-tech medical tests and procedures that are available today, an accurate family health history remains one of the most important tools in keeping yourself healthy as you age. Here’s what you should know, along with some tips and tools to help get you started.

Inheritable Diseases

Just as you can inherit your father’s height or your mother’s eye color, you can also inherit their genetic risk for diseases like cancer, diabetes, heart disease, and more. If one generation of a family has high blood pressure, for example, it is not unusual for the next generation to have it too. Therefore, tracing the illnesses suffered by your relatives can help you and your doctor predict the disorders you may be at risk for, so you can take action to keep yourself healthy.

Family Tracking

To create a family health history, you’ll need to start by collecting some basic medical information on your first-degree relatives including your parents, siblings, and children. Then move on to your grandparents, aunts, uncles, and first cousins.

You need to get the specific ages of when they developed health problems like heart disease, cancer, diabetes, arthritis, dementia, depression, etc. If family members are deceased, you need to know when and how they died. If possible, include lifestyle information as well, such as diet, exercise, smoking, and alcohol use.

Some relatives may not want to share their medical histories or they may not know their family history, but whatever information you discover will be helpful.

To get information on diseased relatives, get a copy of their death certificate. This will list their cause of death and the age he or she died. To get a death certificate, contact the vital records office in the state where your relative died, or go to vitalchek.com.

Helpful Resources

To get help putting together your family health history, the U.S. Surgeon General offers a free web-based tool called “My Family Health Portrait” (see familyhistory.hhs.gov) that can help you collect, organize and understand your genetic risks and even share the information with your family members and doctors.

Another great resource that provides similar assistance is the Genetic Alliance’s online tool called “Does It Run In the Family.” At familyhealthhistory.org you can create a customized guide on your family health history for free. Or, if you don’t have Internet access, call 202-966-5557 and ask them to send you a free hardcopy of these booklets in the mail.

And, if you’re adopted, the National Foster Care & Adoption Directory Search may be able to help you locate your birth parents to get their medical history. See childwelfare.gov/nfcad or call 1-800-394-3366.

Managing Your Results

If you discover some serious health problems that run in your family, don’t despair. While you can’t change your genes, you can change your habits to increase your chances of a healthy future. By eating a healthy diet, exercising, and not smoking, you can offset and sometimes even neutralize your genetic vulnerabilities. This is especially true for heart disease, stroke, type-2 diabetes, and osteoporosis.

A family medical history can also alert you to get early and frequent screening tests, which can help detect other problems (high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and cancers like breast, ovarian, prostrate, and colon cancer) in their early stages when they’re most treatable.

Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC “Today” show and author of The Savvy Senior. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org.
 
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