Saturday, July 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoFound dog, cream white and black male w/ blue collar walking on hwy 181 by new richardson chevy last night call 2102863515
Lost: Calf, red and black tiger striped, white faced, Oak Hill Rd. off U.S. Hwy. 87, La Vernia. Call Carrol, 210-488-3071. 

VideoFOUND . Chihuahua mix male. Near SS Water La Vernia. 512-550-1163.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Intertek Testing Laboratory in Elmendorf, TX is now hiring for a Project Facilitator. Candidate will respond and follow-up on quote requests and assist in preparation of forecasts and sales reports. Must be able to work independently in a fast-paced, multi-tasking environment with shifting priorities. Qualified individuals send resumes to tracie.stanush@intertek.com.
Oilfield Service Company in Floresville looking for general labor positions specializing in frac pit liners and Class A CDL drivers. Labor intensive, some travel required, varying schedules. Prior experience in oilfield a plus. Competitive pay depending on experience, health benefits offered. Come work for a growing company. Apply online at www.mustangenergyservices.com or in person at 105 Rancho Grande off F.M. 537, Floresville.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Some extremely dry areas still, but much of Texas looks green


Some extremely dry areas still, but much of Texas looks green
STEVE BYRNS/Texas A&M Agrilife Extension Service Icy, wet weather in West Central Texas brought much fieldwork to a standstill, but made for some great views.


E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
Robert Burns
December 11, 2013
4,002 views
Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- Driving through Central Texas recently, Dr. Travis Miller said he saw a lot of green that wasn’t there this time last year.

“There are certainly still some severely dry areas in the state,” said Miller, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension agronomist and Texas A&M University soil and crop sciences associate department head, College Station. “But over the last month to 60 days, we’ve had significant rainfall in a lot of Texas, and it’s made a lot of difference.”

The rains have perked up winter pastures and given wheat and oat crops a boost across much of the state, he said. The raised soil-moisture reserves, though still low in some areas, are much improved, giving farmers optimism for next year’s plantings.

“The Rolling Plains and Northern Plains are still very dry, and conditions there aren’t real favorable,” Miller said. “We did see some pretty good snowfall in the South Plains last week, and it will certainly contribute to causing wheat stands to grow and survive longer. There was not a lot of deep moisture, but it certainly perked things up.”

Far West Texas also got some rains, which will make a difference. Also, the cold weather should reduce insect problems for next year, he said.

There was some conjecture that the early bout of extremely cold weather in parts of the state might signal this winter being colder than normal, but Miller said national forecasts are predicting the opposite.

The forecast by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration for December through January was for above normal temperatures for most of Texas, he said.

AgriLife Extension district reporters compiled the following summaries:

AgriLife Extension district reporters for the Southwest District, including Wilson, Gonzales, Guadalupe, and Bexar counties, reported recent rains improved rangeland, pastures and row crops. Some counties reported temperatures dropping into the 30s and 40s. The corn and cotton harvests were finished. Early plantings of wheat and oats for grazing were doing well. Pecan harvest reports were mixed, but most growers had a major drop in production to no production at all. Overall, livestock continued to remain in very good condition because of an abundance of available forage. The hunting season was going well with the deer rut winding down.

AgriLife Extension district reporters for the Coastal Bend District, including Karnes County, reported wet conditions improved soil-moisture levels but hindered fieldwork. Field preparation for winter crops continued where soils were not saturated by last week’s rains. A few counties reported their first freeze of the year. Hay production looked better than it had for several years. Cattle were in good shape, and the livestock markets were strong.

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
auto chooserVoncille Bielefeld homeHeavenly Touch homeDrama KidsTriple R DC ExpertsAllstate & McBride Realty

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.