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Bear, please come home! Missing since October 22, 2014, black Manx cat (no tail), shy. Reward! Help him find his way home. 210-635-7560.
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Lost: Female German Shepherd, about 2 years old, pink collar, lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks Subdivisions off FM 539, La Vernia, on Thurs., Feb. 4. Reward! 830-947-3465.
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Sign maker/Installer, no experience necessary, will train, must have reliable transportation, valid driver license, ability to lift 50-70 pounds, must be able to work indoors and outdoors.  Apply in person at Photographs by Jim/Eagle Ford Signs, 1013 C. Street, Floresville. No Phone Calls.
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Agriculture Today


‘Hybrid’ oak vs. live oak




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South Texas Gardener
February 5, 2014 | 5,923 views | Post a comment

Q: You talk about using suet to attract insect-eating birds. In the old days, we used chunks of beef fat for the purpose. Is that as effective as the expensive blocks sold at the feed stores?

A: Birds like both. The blocks at the feed store have seed and/or fruit added so that they also attract seed- and fruit-eating birds.

The most serious insect eaters are starlings, wrens, woodpeckers, warblers, mockingbirds, and kinglets.

Q: Are the “hybrid” live oaks better than the regular live oaks?

A: All live oaks are technically hybrids. They are grown from seed with two parents’ genes and not vegetatively reproduced.

The trees advertised as “hybrids” were grown from the seed of a parent tree that was identified as fast growing and more upright. If you want those characteristics, select a tree marketed as a “hybrid.”

Q: When can I replace my winter-blooming annuals with the summer flowers?

A: Plant zinnias, begonias, coleus, and other hot-weather bloomers in late March through June.

Calvin Finch is a horticulturist/director of the Water Conservation and Technology Center, Texas A&M-San Antonio. Hear him on “Gardening South Texas” on KLUP 930 AM radio Sat. noon to 2 p.m., and 1-3 p.m. Sun.
 

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