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VideoLost: Shih Tzu, male, golden brown, from C.R. 320 in Floresville. If you have any information call 210-452-1829 or 832-292-3305.

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The 81st Judicial District Attorney’s office, which includes Frio, La Salle, Atascosa, Karnes and Wilson Counties, is accepting resumes for an Assistant District Attorney position. The selected candidate will work directly under the Border Prosecution Unit Initiative dedicated to Human Trafficking/Human Smuggling. Responsibilities of the position include working closely with federal, state and local law enforcement agencies, felony intake, preparation of cases for grand jury, negotiating pleas and representation of the State of Texas in pretrial proceedings, as well as in criminal bench trials and jury trials in District Court. All applicants must be a graduate of an accredited law school and licensed to practice law by the State of Texas and have a minimum of fifteen (15) years prosecutorial experience and extensive felony trial experience. Salary commensurate with experience. Resumes will be accepted through close of business, September 3, 2015. EMAIL resumes and cover letters to terireyes@81stda.org or fax to 830-393-2205. DISTRICT ATTORNEY RENE PENA C/O, TERI REYES, Office Manager; 1327 THIRD STREET, FLORESVILLE, TEXAS 78114. Fax 830-393-2205, terireyes@81stda.org.
ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
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Tips from the Coupon Queen


Readers respond to non-coupon user




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Disclaimer:
Jill Cataldo is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.

February 19, 2014 | 2,362 views | Post a comment

In a recent column, I featured an email from a reader named Brian, who stated that he never used coupons because he “felt cheap” when using them. This column generated a lot of email from coupon fans -- and why wouldn’t it? If you’re reading this column, it wouldn’t be much of a stretch to infer that you’re interested in saving some money.

While the stigma of using coupons still exists in some circles, the surge in coupon use that arrived in 2008 fueled couponing into the mainstream as a hip, fun and frugal thing to do. But, some people still don’t see it that way. They’re afraid (gasp!) that someone will see them using that little piece of paper and paying less.

Dear Jill,

You quote Brian in your today’s newspaper column, “I hardly use a coupon. I feel cheap when I do.”

I wonder if Brian haggles over the price of a new car, or if he marches into the dealership and plunks down the sticker price for it ­-- or for a new lawn mower or garden tiller? I’m willing to bet that he looks for sales, and that such deals don’t make him feel “cheap.” I think it is more a case of not wanting to bother finding, organizing, and using coupons that individually represent “mere” cents off.

Groceries are small, the prices are small, but added together the amount saved comes to a lot for those on smaller budgets. Couponing takes a little time, commitment to keeping a budget intact and organization, not to mention remembering to plan ahead and take the coupons with you to the store.

All in all, I don’t need to use coupons. We are very fortunate in terms of our financial situation. But, it’s a great hobby, more than pays for itself and satisfies my desire to be frugal. I think it is silly not to use coupons, and really think that everyone should try it.

Mary J.

Reader John tackles the economic angle, echoing one of my longtime mottos: You can spend money to save time or you can spend time to save money.

Dear Jill,

A shopper’s decision to use coupons is based on the customer’s trade-off between the costs of using coupons (time to collect them, embarrassment to use them for some) and the financial savings obtained. Manufacturers long ago identified that coupons can provide a lower price to a particular segment of consumers -- those who value money over their time. Marketers know that the users of coupons are more price-sensitive than nonusers of coupons. Coupons allow more price-sensitive people to get a discount without granting that same discount to people who don’t require it. Less price sensitive people will not spend their time with coupons.

John W.

I agree! In my Super-Couponing savings workshops, I often say, “Do you want to spend money or do you want to spend time? Time, I’ve got!” It always gets a laugh, but what follows are nods of recognition. One of the biggest misconceptions people have about couponing is that it’s going to take them far too much time. They know they could be saving money -- significant money -- with coupons, but they feel overwhelmed with the idea of managing “all those coupons.” The time I spend preparing for my weekly shopping trip usually ranges somewhere between 30 and 60 minutes a week. It’s not an enormous amount of time to spend on an activity that translates to a significantly lower grocery bill each week.

Smart Living Tip: Don’t be afraid to invest a little time to save money. We pride ourselves on finding the best airfare, the best hotel rate and the best price for a new vehicle. But many people spend more on groceries each year than they do on travel, entertainment or other categories. Take pride in paying the best prices for your grocery and household purchases too.

Jill Cataldo, a coupon workshop instructor, writer and mother of three, never passes up a good deal. Learn more about Super-Couponing at her website, www.jillcataldo.com. Email your own couponing victories and questions to jill@ctwfeatures.com.


Coupons in today’s paper:

• $5 OFF, Air Vent Cleaning
special, King Carpet Services, 8B
• $10 OFF, LifeChek Drug, 8B
• BOGO Admission, Krossfire
paintball, 8B
• 50% off, Holiday car wash, 8B
• 10% OFF, Air Pro, 5D
• Buy 1 meal, get 1 free, Kicaster
Country Store, 8B
• FREE 20 oz. cup of coffee, The
Tote, 8B
• $25 OFF Red Wing or Irish Setter,
$15 OFF Worx, Red Wing Shoes, 1D
• $10 OFF prescription, Spry Insert
 
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