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VideoStill missing: Long hair Chihuahua, near 3rd and Hwy. 97, Floresville, she is very missed. If you see her please call Jeri, 409-781-3191.

VideoBoxer mix found with red collar in Floresville. Good with kids and other dogs. Very obedient. If owner doesnt respond in the next week he is free to good home.
*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound
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Remodeling carpenter, tape and floater, plumber, electrician, 10 or more years experience. Call 210-422-1780. 
ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
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Agriculture Today


From bumper crop to bust


From bumper crop to bust
The lemons growing on Jose Mendoza’s Meyer lemon tree in the Eagle Creek subdivision weigh down branches in mid-December.


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Wilson County News
March 12, 2014
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Savoring the sweetness of a bumper crop of Meyer lemons has soured for Jose Mendoza, after the arctic chills this winter caused his tree to defoliate.

Mendoza’s Meyer lemon tree was headed for a bumper crop, with 150 boxes of lemons harvested in mid-December. Extreme cold halted the huge harvest, however.

In February, Mendoza, who lives in the Eagle Creek subdivision north of Floresville, contacted the Wilson County News, saying he had given away 585 lemons and “let the freeze have 889.” He reported that the tree had lost most of its leaves, but these were starting to come back.

Dr. Calvin Finch, a horticulturist and director of the Water Conservation and Technology Center at Texas A&M University-San Antonio wrote in mid-February that if “one of your [Meyers] trees defoliated, it will probably survive, but you won’t be able to expect any fruit in 2014.”

See “Is dormant oil safe to use on fruit trees?” Feb. 19 for how to treat trees that were defoliated by the freezing temperatures.
 

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