Wednesday, September 2, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found

*Includes FREE photo online! mywcn.com/lostandfound

VideoStill missing: Long hair Chihuahua, near 3rd and Hwy. 97, Floresville, she is very missed. If you see her please call Jeri, 409-781-3191.

VideoFound: Male dog in Eagle Creek, with collar no tags, clean and healthy, very friendly, non aggressive. Call if he's yours, 210-844-1951. 
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

The Floresville Independent School District is accepting applications for District Wide Custodian Positions, 2:00 p.m. to 10:30 p.m. shift. Applications may be obtained online at www.fisd.us or contact Sylvia Campa at 830-393-5300 ext. 14002 for appointments. FISD Personnel Office is located at 1200 5th St., Floresville, Texas. 830-393-5300 (Office hours: 8:00-4:00). Applications will be accepted until all positions are filled. An Equal Opportunity Employer.
Journeyman electrician and apprentice electrician needed, experience necessary. Call Sralla Electric at 210-885-4101.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Options when considering restocking




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
April 9, 2014 | 4,200 views | Post a comment

By Blair Fannin

WACO -- With the cattle market at all-time highs and drought having decimated herds across Texas, some might consider restocking, but are questioning if it’s the right time to buy.

The answer: It depends, says one expert.

Dr. Stephen Hammack, a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service beef cattle specialist in Stephenville, walked through the different metrics of buying replacement cattle at the Blackland Income Growth Conference in Waco.

“They’re closer to 1,300 pounds and we are feeding practically everything we produce that is not retained for heifers. We’ve got better genetics to produce more pounds; we also have growth promotants and better nutrition.”

Hammack said if you are thinking about restocking, “there are different alternatives and factors involved.”

Those include:

•Cattle availability

•Initial investment

•Development phase

•Rebreeding potential

•Potential longevity

•Calving difficulty/death loss.

First, Hammack recommended producers visit http://beef.tamu.edu/rebuilding for background information and resources to help with decision-making. Next, Hammack discussed the different options producers have when considering rebuilding their herds such as retaining heifers, purchasing heifers, buying cow-calf pairs, or three-in-ones (a single cow that is bred and has a calf by its side).

For retained heifers, Hammack said the obvious challenge is not having a calf for two years and the animal’s nutritional needs. The “pluses” are availability, marketing flexibility, genetic potential, and longevity.

For purchased heifers less than 700 pounds, the pluses are availability, marketing flexibility, and initial investment. The minuses include the development phase, rebreeding potential, dystocia/death loss, above-average nutritional needs, and high cull rate.

For purchased heifers greater than 700 pounds, bred heifers, and first calf pairs, Hammack said the pluses are longevity, while the minuses include initial investment, rebreeding potential, nutritional needs, and cull rate.

Blair Fannin is a media relations specialist with Texas A&M AgriLife Communications, serving both Texas A&M AgriLife Research and the Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
auto chooserAllstate & McBride RealtyVoncille Bielefeld homeDrama KidsTriple R DC ExpertsHeavenly Touch home

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.