Saturday, February 6, 2016
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

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Lost & Found


VideoREWARD. LOST CAT: Gray and white male cat, since Nov. 13, on C.R. 429, Stockdale, wearing a silver collar. Call 512-629-2005 with any information.
Lost: Male Red Nose Pit Bull, "Chevy," wearing an orange collar, friendly, last seen on County Road 403. 830-477-6511 or 830-534-9094.
Lost: Female German Shepherd, 2 years old, pink collar. Lost from Hickory Hill/Great Oaks area off FM539, La Vernia on Thurs. Feb. 4 Reward! (830) 947-3465
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Help Wanted

*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
Actively seeking a CDL driver, Floresville, TX., must have a VALID Class A driver license, clean driving record, and minimum 5 years’ driving experience. Responsibilities include hauling equipment and plastic to and from location. Driver is in charge of maintaining cleanliness and maintenance of vehicle. There is no set schedule, hours vary and traveling is involved. Call Mustang Energy Services, 830-393-1034.
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Agriculture Today


New Dust Bowl days not here yet




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Robert Burns
April 16, 2014 | 5,281 views | Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- Though it may seem like a return of Dust Bowl days to some Texas High Plains farmers and ranchers, we’re not there yet -- at least not quite, according to Dr. John Neilsen-Gammon, state climatologist in College Station.

However, the March 25 reports from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service county agents do give evidence of some very difficult working conditions for producers in the Panhandle, South Plains, and Rolling Plains regions.

Mark Brown, AgriLife Extension agent for Lubbock County, reported only a trace of moisture for March with sustained high winds and gusts of 58 mph on March 18 accompanied by blowing dust.

Rick Auckerman, AgriLife Extension agent for Deaf Smith County in the western Panhandle, said wind speeds of 30 to 50 mph bore down on the county for most of the week, and producers were running out of tools to stop soil from blowing away.

Nielsen-Gammon said, “Over the past few weeks, the dust seems to be mainly picked up from southeastern Colorado and eastern New Mexico, so we’re not having a problem with widespread soil loss in Texas so far, but it’s something that could happen if conditions don’t allow for spring green-up, which they haven’t yet.”

Auckerman noted that though it may feel like a return of the Dust Bowl days as fences are being covered up by sand and dirt in Deaf Smith County, modern producers have a lot more tools to fight blows, including U.S. Department of Agriculture Conservation Reserve Program grassland.

But on much of regular farmland, there isn’t a lot of growth to hold the dirt in place, Auckerman said.

There hasn’t been green-up of grasses because December through February have been the tenth driest on record in the last ten years, Nielsen-Gammon said.

“The last time it was drier (the first quarter of the year) was in 1996,” he said.

Reservoir levels

The other issue that continues to hover is a possible battle between towns and agriculture over extremely limited reservoir levels, Nielsen-Gammon said.

“If we don’t see summer months of more than average rainfall, we will likely see conflicts between agricultural and municipal/industrial uses.”

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

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