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Lost & Found

Lost: Chihuahua, black, tan, and white male, "Spy," very small, off F.M. 775, across from the Woodlands on Sept. 26, he is missed dearly. Call 830-391-5055.
Lost: Men's wallet, Sept. 21 at Wal-Mart fuel center in Floresville, left on side of truck, medical IDs needed. If found call 210-827-9753, no questions asked.

VideoLost: Basset hound mix puppy, goes by the name "Darla," 15272 U.S. Hwy. 87 W, La Vernia. Call Kaitlynn at 210-758-2495.
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Be skeptical of ads that say you can make lots of money working from the comfort of your home. If this were true, wouldn’t we all be working at home?
ON-CALL CRISIS POOL WORKERS NEEDED. Part-time positions are available for after hours “on-call” crisis workers to respond to mental health crisis for Wilson and Karnes Counties. Duties include crisis interventions, assessments, referrals to stabilization services, and referrals for involuntary treatment services according to the Texas Mental Health Laws. You must have at least a Bachelor’s Degree in psychology, sociology, social work, nursing, etc. On-call hours are from 5 p.m.-8 a.m. weekdays, weekends and holidays vary. If selected, you must attend required training and must be able to report to designated safe sites within 1 hour of request for assessment. Compensation is at a rate of $200 per week plus $100 per completed and submitted crisis assessment, and mileage. If interested call Camino Real Community Services, 210-357-0359.
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South Texas Living

Healthy Living: Read this before gardening

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Charles Stuart Platkin, PhD.
April 23, 2014 | 3,579 views | Post a comment

While gardening can burn about 316 calories per hour, it also requires a lot of bending, stretching, lifting, and moving in ways that we don’t typically do. Paula Kramer, Ph.D., professor of occupational therapy at University of the Sciences in Philadelphia, suggests the following:

•Stretch, even for a few days prior, before working in the garden.

•Use a fat, rubberized- or padded-handled trowel for less strain on the arms and joints.

•Tools, such as shears or clippers, with a spring-action, self-opening feature help prevent strain on the muscles and joints.

•Sit while working or take sitting breaks to decrease stress on your back, knees, and hips.

•When lifting potted plants or bags of mulch, bend your knees and lift straight up, keeping your back straight. Concentrate on using the leg muscles rather than the back muscles to lift.

•Do not try to whip your entire garden into shape in one day.

Charles Platkin, Ph.D., is a nutrition and public health advocate and founder of

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