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Karnes/Wilson Juvenile Probation Department is seeking the following positions: Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. Position is year round supervising juvenile offenders, making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Attendance/Juvenile Probation Officer: Must be degreed in Criminal Justice or related field with experience working with children and parents. The Attendance Officer works same hours as the school districts providing prevention services to children and parents who have issues with truancy. Juvenile Probation Officer will manage a small caseload of juvenile offenders making recommendations to court, curfew checks, and being on call. Position is year round.  Individual must be versatile and able to separate prevention from intervention skills. Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor within the environment of the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Follows JJAEP school calendar. This is a quasi-military program, so prior military experience a plus. Degreed individual preferred with experience working with children. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or be able to obtain the certification. Administrative Prevention Specialist: Position acts as a drill instructor but takes on administrative assistant role to the Assistant Chief within the Juvenile Justice Alternative Education Program (JJAEP). Position will include direct contact with the child and parent. Must be a Juvenile Supervision Officer or able to obtain. Prefer degreed individual. Must have knowledge of military procedures. To apply send resume to n-schmidt@kwjpd.com.
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Agriculture Today


Most peaches, pecans undamaged by the freeze; jury still out on wheat




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Robert Burns
May 7, 2014 | 4,085 views | Post a comment

There were varied reports of damage to wheat, forages, and fruit and nut crops from the hard freeze on April 15 from Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service personnel throughout the Central, Rolling Plains, South Plains, and Panhandle regions.

A statewide summary of damage to wheat in those areas is pending. However, Dr. Larry Stein, AgriLife Extension horticulturist for fruits, nuts, and vegetable crops at Uvalde, was certain pecan and peach orchards were left mostly unscathed.

A large part of the reason for the lack of damage was due to preventive measures taken by orchard owners and managers, Stein said.

“After the late freezes last year, a lot of people were on guard this year and ready to do whatever they could,” he said. “The big thing was watering before the freeze.”

In 2013, the Texas peach crop was hammered by two exceptionally late freezes, one in late April, and for some areas, another in May. This year, an early March freeze caused some alarm, but most peach varieties had not yet bloomed and buds were tight enough to escape damage, Stein said. In 2013, the extreme drought meant many orchards were stressed before the freeze, making them more susceptible to damage.

Preventive measures can also include applying irrigation water to trees during a freeze, he said.

“You can run water during the time of the freeze,” Stein said. “When water goes from a liquid to a solid, it’s going to give off heat. And as long as that’s happening, it’s not going to get below 32 degrees (at the tree level).”

Pecans were also mostly left unharmed, he said.

“There were actually a few trees that were nipped back in a few locations, in the lower spots,” Stein said. “The good news is there was only a few primary buds were forced, and there will be secondary buds that will come that will make pecans. But a lot of the primary buds hadn’t forced yet.”

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.
 

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