Saturday, July 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search


Lost & Found


VideoPlease help my toy Aussie get home..181 & 1604 area. She's an adult,13" & less than 20 pounds. Please call if you see or find her. 210-328-5050

VideoFound 2 year old female Basset Hound at the corner of 360 Shorthorn & 204 Longhorn Rd, Stockdale. Contact Paula at 210-827-9583.
Our beloved Gracie is missing since October, Dachshund/Lab mix, microchipped, about 30 pounds, black with little white. $1000 reward for safe return. Call with any information, 830-393-9999 or 419-250-9099.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Caregivers needed. Call 830-431-2389. 
Live at no charge in upscale apartment as companion for man with autism and intellectual disability, south/downtown San Antonio, foster care through Medicaid Waiver Program, couples may apply, IRS okays wages, nontaxable, background check required. Send resume to mmoyer@satx.rr.com or text for more information 210-382-6369.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today


Water well guidelines




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
June 4, 2014 | 2,901 views | Post a comment

Contributed

The keys to addressing well water quality problems are to determine what the problem is, whether it is preventable, and, if not, how to treat it effectively, the National Ground Water Association announced May 27.

The group’s Public Awareness Director Cliff Treyens said there are basic steps well owners can follow to take the mystery out of solving water quality issues.

“The answer to water quality problems begins with water testing,” Treyens said.

The National Ground Water Association recommends that household water well owners test annually for bacteria, nitrate, and anything of local concern. Local contamination concerns could be manmade or substances that can occur naturally in the environment, such as arsenic and radon.

The organization suggests well owners check with their local health department to determine what might be of local concern. This is important even if the well owner is not experiencing any obvious water quality problems because some potentially harmful contaminants such as arsenic and radon have no odor, taste, or smell.

Next, Treyens said well owners should determine how substances that are causing water quality problems are getting into their water supply.

“If a contamination source is too close to the well, removing that contamination source may be the answer. If one of the well system’s seals is broken and allowing contamination into the well, fixing it may be the answer. And if the contamination is naturally occurring in the groundwater, treating the well water to make it safe is the solution,” Treyens said.

If contamination can be kept out of the groundwater or the well system, it is preferable to address that first. Treyens compared this to a doctor treating the cause of a patient’s illness instead of just the symptoms. But if a substance cannot be kept out of the groundwater that flows into a well, treatment is almost always feasible to address it.

The National Ground Water Association recommends that well owners use a qualified water well system professional to diagnose the cause of water quality problems and recommend solutions.

To learn more about water well and groundwater stewardship, visit www.WellOwner.org.
 

Your Opinions and Comments


Be the first to comment on this story!


You must be logged in to post a comment.




Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives


Coupons ag-right
auto chooserDrama KidsHeavenly Touch homeVoncille Bielefeld homeAllstate & McBride RealtyTriple R DC Experts

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.