Sunday, October 19, 2014
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

Lost & Found


Video Lost: Cat, black and white, last seen the evening of Sept. 29 in the Woodcreek Subdivision area, La Vernia. Reward for his safe return. Call Richard, 830-779-2080 or 210-776-4930.
Found tan hunting dog. Elderly male not neutered or chipped. Please call 830391509

VideoBlack Chihuahua make named Rico. Missing off CR 126. Please call 210-428-3803. He is being missed dearly by his family!
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Delivery Drivers & Helpers - Requires flexible schedule. Will drive refrigerated box trucks to Texas schools. Clean driving record required. CDL preferred but not required. Apply in person at 1371 FM 1346, La Vernia.
The Wilson County Appraisal District is accepting applications and/or resumes for an entry level Field Appraiser position. Responsibilities include office and field work associated with the appraisal of all types of properties. Applicants must be willing to complete the requirements to obtain an RPA designation through the Texas Department of Licensing and Regulation. Interested applicants must have reliable transportation, a valid Texas driver's license, and proof of liability insurance. Send resumes and/or applications to: Wilson County Appraisal District, Attn: Field Appraiser Position, 1611 Railroad Street, Floresville, Texas 78114.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos





Video Vault ›

Commentaries


TELL survey of Texas educators produces more questions than answers




E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story

Disclaimer:
The author of this entry is responsible for this content, which is not edited by the Wilson County News or wilsoncountynews.com.
Contributed
August 20, 2014 | 634 views | Post a comment

By Linda Bridges

We supported the state TELL survey, which surveyed 425,000 educators about teaching and working conditions in public schools, and did a lot of legwork encouraging our members to take it. We felt it was important to get more information on the working environment for school professionals.

Unfortunately, the low response rate and the inability to view much of any specific data related to campuses and districts leave us with a lot more questions than answers, and that’s a position you usually don’t want to be in after spending a lot of time and money on a statewide survey of 425,000 educators.

We also expressed our concerns to TEA about the 50 percent participation rate threshold required for public reporting of the results. While we agree that some threshold is needed, we would have preferred a lower threshold and more information on how representative the responses were for different types of educators and campuses.

Without the ability to evaluate specific kinds of campuses, the overall results could be misleading. For instance, is there a particular type of district or campus that was most likely to meet the 50 percent participation threshold for public examination of results?

What does it tell us when only 9 percent of districts met the 50 percent threshold, with the vast majority of those being small districts or charter school districts? How revealing can the results be if every major urban school district--with the exception of Austin ISD, which required participation--fell significantly short of the 50 percent threshold?

Two districts facing challenges in educating our kids, Houston ISD and Dallas ISD, had dismal participation rates--11 percent and 13 percent respectively. That only allows us to view results for 8 of the 286 campuses in Houston ISD, and 21 of the 233 campuses in Dallas ISD.

While there are going to be kinks in any project of this size, we noted a significant number of problems with its implementation. Key problems included lack of knowledge of the survey, administrators stifling participation, and educator mistrust that the results truly would be anonymous.

Many educators also felt the questions presented were too vague. For example, we know that time spent preparing for and administering standardized tests is a significant concern, but two questions simply asking for the number of hours spent per week on assessments aren’t sufficient to gauge that impact.

Here are a few of the comments we received regarding the survey:

“I would have never known about this survey had I not stumbled upon it.”

“The survey did not feel confidential because you had to request a code, and the admin would be aware of who received what code.”·

“Every teacher I spoke to at my campus was basically afraid to be completely honest. No one believed in the anonymity, and retaliation in the school is swift and very stern.”

“My principal knew nothing about it, and I had to request the codes myself for the campus. I encouraged teachers to complete the survey personally and during in-service. We got only 40% of our campus to participate.”

“It asked for my campus name, my grade level, what other grades I've taught, and my years of experience. And they considered it an ‘anonymous’ survey. Really?”

“I was never given a code. It was awkward to ask admin for a code. I did request one online, but by the time I knew about the survey, I was neck-deep in end-of-year duties, so the timing was bad.”

“I didn't find the survey useful at all. The questions were entirely too vague, not specific enough to be of any use to anyone.”

Bridges is president of the Texas branch of the American Federation of Teachers (Texas AFT). The Texas AFT represents more than 65,000 teachers, paraprofessionals, support personnel, and higher-education employees across the state. Texas AFT is affiliated with the 1.6-million-member American Federation of Teachers.
 
« Previous Blog Entry (August 20, 2014)
 


Your Opinions and Comments
Be the first to comment on this story!

You must be logged in to post comments:



Other Commentaries



Commentaries
Commentaries page govtrack.us
Commentaries who represents me?

Allstate & McBride RealtyWilson's Auto ChooserBlue Moon Karaoke & DJTriple R DC ExpertsVoncille Bielefeld homeSacred Heart SchoolHeavenly Touch homeChester WilsonDrama Kids
  Copyright © 2007-2014 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.