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South Texas Living


Medicare for non-working spouses




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Jim Miller
August 24, 2016 | 1,356 views | Post a comment

Dear Savvy Senior,

Does Medicare cover spouses who have not worked? I have worked all my life, but my spouse worked only for a few years when we first got married but then quit to take care of our children fulltime. Will she be eligible for Medicare?

Inquiring Husband

Dear Inquiring,

The answer generally is yes, your spouse can qualify for Medicare on your work record. Here’s how it works.

Eligibility Rules

To be eligible, you must have worked and paid Medicare taxes for at least 10 years to qualify for premium-free Medicare Part A hospital coverage when you turn 65. If you qualify, then your non-working spouse will qualify too, based on your work record when she turns 65.

Divorced spouses are also eligible if they were married at least 10 years and are single, as are surviving spouses who are single and who were married for at least nine months before their spouse died.

In addition to Part A, both you and your spouse would also qualify for Medicare Part B, which covers doctor’s visits and other outpatient services, but requires a monthly premium, not a work history. The premium for most Part B beneficiaries in 2016 is $104.90 per month, while new beneficiaries pay $121.80/month and higher earning couples -- those with incomes more than $170,000 per year -- pay even more.

There are also a number of other caveats you should know about depending on your wife’s age.

Older Spouse

If your wife is older than you, she can qualify for Medicare on your work record at age 65, even if you’re not getting Medicare yourself, but you must be at least 62 years old. You also must have been married for at least one year for your wife to apply for Medicare on your work record.

If you are still working and your wife is covered by your employer’s health insurance, she may want to enroll only in the premium-free Medicare Part A until you retire or your employer coverage ends. Part B -- along with its premium -- can be added later without penalty as long as your employer’s group health plan is your “primary coverage.” Check with your employers’ human resources department to find out about this.

If your wife is more than three years older than you and has no health coverage, you can buy her Medicare Part A until you turn 62 and the premium-free benefit kicks in. The Part A monthly premium is $411 in 2016.

Younger Spouse

If your wife is younger than you, she will need health insurance until she turns 65 and becomes eligible for Medicare. This may be through your employer if you are still working, through COBRA, or through the Health Insurance Marketplace or outside the marketplace through a private insurance company.

Other Medicare Options

In addition to Medicare Part A and B, when you and your wife become Medicare eligible, each of you will also need to enroll in a Part D prescription drug plan if you don’t have credible drug coverage from your employer or union. And, you may want to purchase a Medicare supplemental (Medigap) policy too, to help pay for things that aren’t covered by Medicare. Or, you may consider a Medicare Advantage plan.

For more information on Medicare choices and enrollment rules, visit Medicare.gov or call 1-800-633-4227. You can also get help through your State Health Insurance Assistance Program, which provides free Medicare counseling.

Jim Miller is a contributor to the NBC “Today” show and author of The Savvy Senior. Send your senior questions to: Savvy Senior, P.O. Box 5443, Norman, OK 73070, or visit SavvySenior.org.
 

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