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Lost: Border Collie, black and light brown, 9 months old, wearing a green collar, last seen Sept. 22 near CR 427 in Poth. If found call 210-324-1208.
Found: Male MinPin?, about 2 years old, not fixed, sweet, very smart, on Sept. 25 inside Floresville Walmart, healthy, no fleas, clean teeth, manicured nails, will keep if owner not found. 830-542-0280.
Found: Pony. Call to describe, 830-391-0074.
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HEAVY EQUIPMENT OPERATORS NEEDED. Experience, References & TDL required. Call Brent @ 830-221-8666 M-F, 8 to 5 ONLY. Acme Bridge Co. is EOE & a DRUG FREE WORKZONE.
F&W Electrical is now hiring journeyman, backhoe operators, and laborers. Apply at 6880 U.S. Hwy. 181 N., Floresville, Monday-Friday, 8-5. 830-393-0083. EOE.
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Agriculture Today

Anthrax case confirmed in Irion County sheep

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August 15, 2012 | 3,579 views | Post a comment

AUSTIN -- A yearling female sheep in West Texas has been diagnosed with anthrax, according to an Aug. 1 Texas Animal Health Commission (TAHC) press release. This is the second confirmed case of anthrax in a Texas animal for 2012 and the first in livestock this year. The infected sheep was located near Mertzon, in Irion County, which is approximately 26 miles southwest of San Angelo. The TAHC has quarantined the premises. TAHC regulations require vaccinations of exposed livestock and proper disposal of carcasses before a quarantine can be released.

Anthrax is a bacterial disease caused by Bacillus anthracis, which is a naturally occurring organism with worldwide distribution, including Texas. It is not uncommon for anthrax to be diagnosed in livestock or wildlife in the southwestern part of the state. Basic sanitation precautions, such as hand washing and wearing long sleeves and gloves, can prevent accidental spread of the bacteria to people if handling affected livestock or carcasses.

Acute fever followed by rapid death with bleeding from body openings are all common signs of anthrax in livestock. Carcasses may also appear bloated and appear to decompose quickly. Livestock or animals displaying symptoms consistent with anthrax should be reported to a private practitioner or TAHC official.

For more information regarding anthrax, contact your local TAHC region, call 1-800-550-8242, or visit

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