Sunday, October 4, 2015
1012 C Street  •  Floresville, TX 78114  •  Phone: 830-216-4519  •  Fax: 830-393-3219  • 

WCN Site Search

Lost & Found

Lost: Men's wallet, Sept. 21 at Wal-Mart fuel center in Floresville, left on side of truck, medical IDs needed. If found call 210-827-9753, no questions asked.

VideoLost: Basset hound mix puppy, goes by the name "Darla," 15272 U.S. Hwy. 87 W, La Vernia. Call Kaitlynn at 210-758-2495.

VideoMissing Chihuahua off 775 across from the Woodlands on Sept. 26th. Spy is very small, he is Black, Tan, & White. Spy is missed dearly. Please contact 830-391-5055.
More Lost & Found ads ›

Help Wanted

Data entry position for Angell Enterprises, full-time positions for very busy office, customer service skills a must, pay based on experience. Serious applicants apply in person at 2301 10th St., Floresville, ask for Hilda.
*Fair Housing notice. All help wanted advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Fair Housing Act which makes it illegal to advertise "any preference limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, or national origin, or an intention, to make any such preference limitation or discrimination." This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertising for help wanted ads, which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis.
More Help Wanted ads ›

Featured Videos

Video Vault ›
You’ve been granted free access to this subscribers only article.

Agriculture Today

Cotton plantings could be down as much as 25 percent

E-Mail this Story to a Friend
Print this Story
Robert Burns
March 27, 2013 | 4,259 views | Post a comment

COLLEGE STATION -- Texas cotton planting is expected to be down by as much as 25 percent from last year, according to a Texas A&M AgriLife Extension Service state cotton specialist.

In December, a National Cotton Council survey showed farmers’ intended cotton plantings in Texas for 2013 to be 4.9 million acres, down by about 25 percent from actual plantings in 2012 of 6.55 million acres, said Dr. Gaylon Morgan, AgriLife Extension state cotton specialist, College Station.

“Since then, prices have gone up a little for cotton and come down a little for grain crops, so my guess is that the National Cotton Council survey hopefully is the worst-case scenario for planted cotton acres,” he said.

Also, there has been more rainfall than expected, which will affect cotton-planting intentions, Morgan said.

“We got some rain in early January, which helped out those drier areas, and despite the long-term forecasts predicting drier-than-normal precipitation, we’ve actually accumulated a decent amount of rainfall in the High Plains and Rolling Plains just this last week or so,” he said.

The Coastal Bend and Rio Grande Valley cotton growing areas remain under extreme drought conditions, he noted.

“Additionally, long-term weather predictions are for above-normal temperatures, which can also magnify a limited in-season precipitation.”

But the recent rains likely will have an adverse effect on intended cotton planting, as it will mean more acres will stay in or go to grain crops, Morgan said.

“A lot of cotton acres went into wheat last fall, and with the rains in the High Plains and Rolling Plains, they’ll probably stick with wheat,” he said. “Also there’s talk of a lot of sorghum going in.”

The National Cotton Council survey predicted 9.01 million acres for the United States, Morgan said. Total upland cotton planting for the United States was more than 12 million acres in 2012. In the Southwest, which includes Texas, Oklahoma, Kansas, and New Mexico, cotton plantings are expected to be down more than 24 percent in 2013.

Morgan also noted that there was a similar drop -- about 23 to 24 percent -- in cotton acreage in 2006 going into 2007. Then, as now, relatively high grain prices were a factor in the reduction of cotton acres, he said.

Robert Burns has nearly 30 years’ experience writing about agriculture and agricultural-related research. He writes about Texas AgriLife Research and Texas AgriLife Extension Service activities at the Overton Center and centers in Stephenville and Temple.

Your Opinions and Comments

Be the first to comment on this story!

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Not a subscriber?
Subscriber, but no password?
Forgot password?

Agriculture Today Archives

Coupons ag-right
Triple R DC Expertsauto chooserVoncille Bielefeld homeDrama KidsHeavenly Touch homeAllstate & McBride Realty

  Copyright © 2007-2015 Wilson County News. All rights reserved. Web development by Drewa Designs.